Scopri

Bologna-style ragout

Like most traditional recipes, the Bologna-style ragout has some small variations passed down from family to family.

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 150'

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 150'

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 150'

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 150'

Basic preparations

Vegetable stock

Method

  1. 01 / Prepare the vegetables

    Clean and peel the vegetables

    Cut them into small cubes

    Pour them into a saucepan with a little extra virgin olive oil and let them stew

  2. 02 / Add the meat

    Add the bacon and turn up the heat

    Add the beef and pork and brown them

    Add the white wine and let it evaporate

  3. 03 / Add the other ingredients

    Tie up the herbs with a string

    Add the bunch of herbs, the tomato pulp and paste

    Add Vegetable stock to cover everything

  4. 04 / Continue cooking

    After at least an hour, add the milk

    Add salt and pepper to taste

    Let it cook for another hour and a half at least

    At the end of cooking, remove the bunch of herbs

Wine pairing

Following the Region’s origin of the recipe, pair with a lively Lambrusco from Emilia; but if you prefer still wines, opt for a Sangiovese di Romagna.

Basic preparations

Vegetable stock

If you do not have time to finish cooking in one session, you may interrupt it: so, put the ragout in the fridge and finish cooking it the next day.

Do not underestimate the importance of meat:

Do not use lean meat, but rich in connective tissue and suitable for long cooking times.

Mix beef with pork

The sauté must be carefully prepared:

Do not cut vegetables with a cutter as this reduces them to a pulp.

Cut the vegetables by hand into cubes no larger than those of the meat.

Do not cook the vegetables and meat at the same time: the vegetables should cook on a low heat and when you add the meat, turn up the heat to brown it. Then continue cooking over an extremely low heat.

Do not be in a hurry to remove the meat sauce from the heat: a good meat sauce should cook for at least 2 and a half hours, so do not be afraid to leave it for longer, always cooking it on an extremely low heat. If it dries out, add some broth a bit at a time to avoid the risk of having a ragout that is too liquid.

If you wish, you can keep the ragout covered in the fridge for 3 to 4 days.

If you have leftover ragout, you can freeze it in small portions and defrost the right amount when you need it.

Like most traditional recipes, the Bologna-style ragout has some small variations passed down from family to family.

The ingredients listed are those that respect the original recipe the most, but there are also versions that include other ingredients like

Red wine instead of white wine

Sausage or prosciutto instead of pancetta

Dried mushrooms

Meat stock instead of vegetable stock

The exclusive use of tomato paste

In Italy, there are several ragout versions that are different from the Bologna-style one, including the use of different types of meat. In the Alps it is common to use deer meat, in central Italy wild boar meat, and there is duck ragout on Lake Garda.

Ingredients for 4 people

500 g minced beef

300 g minced pork

80 g pork belly (pancetta), diced

100 ml white wine

100 ml fresh whole milk

1 bunch of sage, rosemary, and bay leaves

400 g of tomato pulp

20 g of tomato paste

300 g celery, carrots, and onions

Vegetable stock

Extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper

Wine pairing

Following the Region’s origin of the recipe, pair with a lively Lambrusco from Emilia; but if you prefer still wines, opt for a Sangiovese di Romagna.

You may also like

Simple syrup

Simple syrup is a versatile sweetener consisting of water and sugar, used as a basic ingredient in many cocktails. Its liquid consistency allows it to be easily mixed into drinks, ensuring an even sweetness. It can be flavored with spices, herbs or fruit.

Clarified butter

Clarified butter is butter from which water and protein have been removed, leaving only the fatty part. It has a higher smoke point than regular butter, and is ideal for frying and cooking at high temperatures without burning.

Carasau bread

Carasau bread is a traditional Sardinian bread, also known as “music paper” because of its crispness. This thin, crispy bread, baked in the oven, is served as an accompaniment to many traditional Sardinian dishes or enriched with olive oil and salt for a tasty appetizer.

Sponge cake

Sponge cake is a soft, light base used in pastry making to make filled cakes, sweet rolls, and pastries. Prepared with few ingredients such as eggs, sugar and flour, it is a must for every pastry chef.

Lentil ragout
Salsa di pomodoro fresco e basilico
Simple syrup

Simple syrup is a versatile sweetener consisting of water and sugar, used as a basic ingredient in many cocktails. Its liquid consistency allows it to be easily mixed into drinks, ensuring an even sweetness. It can be flavored with spices, herbs or fruit.

Clarified butter

Clarified butter is butter from which water and protein have been removed, leaving only the fatty part. It has a higher smoke point than regular butter, and is ideal for frying and cooking at high temperatures without burning.

Carasau bread

Carasau bread is a traditional Sardinian bread, also known as “music paper” because of its crispness. This thin, crispy bread, baked in the oven, is served as an accompaniment to many traditional Sardinian dishes or enriched with olive oil and salt for a tasty appetizer.

Sponge cake

Sponge cake is a soft, light base used in pastry making to make filled cakes, sweet rolls, and pastries. Prepared with few ingredients such as eggs, sugar and flour, it is a must for every pastry chef.

Lentil ragout
Salsa di pomodoro fresco e basilico
Add to favourite
Copyright © 2024 Cuciniamo S.r.l. - P.iva e Cod. Fisc. 11653660966 All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy | Cookie policy | Customize