Scopri

Fillet with red wine sauce and sage pumpkin

Chef Danilo Angè

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 25'

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 25'

Chef Danilo Angè

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 25'

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 25'

Method

  1. 01 / Prepare the pumpkin

    Remove pumpkin rind

    Clean out seeds and pulp and cut into 1-cm cubes

    Peel onion and finely chop

    Melt butter with sage leaves over low heat

    Add onion and gently sauté

    Add pumpkin cubes, salt, and pepper

    Cook for about 15 minutes, until pumpkin is soft but dense

  2. 02 / Prepare the meat

    Salt beef fillets

    Lightly flour on all sides

    Meanwhile, peel shallots

  3. 03 / Cook the meat

    Put a pan over medium heat

    Add extra virgin olive oil

    When the oil is hot, put in beef fillets

    Add sprig of rosemary and shallots

    Brown the meat on all sides, turning without pricking it

    Monitor heat to avoid burning the shallots and lower if necessary

    Cover with red wine and let evaporate

    Add balsamic vinegar

    For a rare fillet, cook on low heat for about 5 minutes, turning halfway through cooking

    If you want the fillets cooked to medium doneness, add 3 minutes to total cook time

    Turn off heat and let fillets rest for 2 minutes before plating

  4. 04 / To serve

    Arrange shallots on serving dishes with a little pan sauce

    Place fillets on top of red wine sauce

    Complete with a drizzle of red wine sauce over the meat

    Serve with cooked pumpkin

Wine pairing

For an ideal pairing, serve the dish with the wine you used to cook it; choose a full-bodied and structured red wine, such as Nebbiolo, Nero d’Avola, or Sassella.

Beef fillet must be prepared right before serving in order to maintain its pleasantness and succulence.

You can prepare the pumpkin side dish a few hours in advance.

When cooking the meat, do not skip the browning stage, which serves to seal the juices inside the fillet.

Be careful not to prick the meat with a fork or other utensil while cooking so as to avoid the juices escaping.

A fillet is a lean cut with little connective tissue, suited to short cooking times; do not cook it longer than indicated or else the meat will be tough and dry.

Remember to let the fillet rest before plating it; this allows the juices to redistribute within the meat so they do not all escape at the first cut.

Do not let the pan sauce dry out; keep the heat gentle and, if necessary, add a drizzle of water or stock.

You can use the leftover meat to prepare Milanese meatballs or a filling for meat ravioli. You can also add it to other meats in a meat sauce.

The leftover pumpkin will keep in the refrigerator for a couple of days closed in an airtight container. You can serve it again as a side dish or use it for a pumpkin risotto.

You can replace the beef fillet with a fillet cut of another meat, like pork, veal, or even game.

Use a high-quality, full-bodied, and structured red wine; you only need a little for cooking the meat, the rest you will drink alongside it.

Traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena is a product of superior quality. If you cannot find it, do not use a vinegar of lesser quality; replace it with one tablespoon of acacia honey dissolved in a ladleful of stock (vegetable or meat).

You can replace the pumpkin with another side dish of your choosing. Sweeter vegetables will maintain the harmony of the recipe.

Ingredients for 4 people

For the fillet

4 beef fillets (150 g each)

30 g tipo 00 flour

20 g extra virgin olive oil

1 sprig rosemary

200 g shallots

150 ml full-bodied red wine

20 ml traditional balsamic vinegar of Modena

Salt and pepper

For pumpkin

80 g onion

40 g butter

2–3 sage leaves

600 g whole pumpkin

Salt and pepper

Wine pairing

For an ideal pairing, serve the dish with the wine you used to cook it; choose a full-bodied and structured red wine, such as Nebbiolo, Nero d’Avola, or Sassella.

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