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Steak tagliata with rosemary

To make an excellent tagliata, the quality of the meat is of fundamental importance.

Chef Danilo Angè

Difficulty: medium

Method: 10'

Cooking: 15'

Rest: 5'

Difficulty: medium

Method: 10'

Cooking: 15'

Rest: 5'

Chef Danilo Angè

Difficulty: medium

Method: 10'

Cooking: 15'

Rest: 5'

Difficulty: medium

Method: 10'

Cooking: 15'

Rest: 5'

Method

  1. 01 / Prepare the flavoured salt

    Detach needles from the rosemary and chop finely with a knife

    Add chopped rosemary to salt and mix

  2. 02 / Prepare the meat

    Turn on the grill or heat up a frying pan

    Preheat the oven to 50 °C

    Clean any excess fat from meat

    Pepper meat

    Massage both sides of meat with the flavoured salt

  3. 03 / Cook the meat

    Put meat on the grill or in a hot pan

    Cook for about 3 minutes

    Turn over

    Let cook for another 3 minutes

    Cook on the side for about 1 minute

    Check to see if meat is cooked by touch

  4. 04 / Rest the meat

    Remove meat from grill or pan and transfer to a resting rack on a baking sheet

    Allow to rest in the oven at 50 °C for 5 minutes

  5. 05 / Prepare the side dish

    Prepare a vinaigrette with salt, pepper, vinegar, and extra virgin olive oil

    Add tomatoes to greens and dress with vinaigrette

  6. 06 / To serve

    Cut meat into slices and arrange on serving dishes

    Accompany with the dressed salad

    Finish meat with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and some salt crystals

Wine pairing

Steak tagliata goes perfectly with full-bodied red wines such as Chianti classico, Gattinara, and Rosso di Montalcino, or other well-structured reds.

Tagliata is a dish that must be cooked on the spot, so preparing it in advance is not recommended.

Do not salt the meat until the last moment; if applied first, the salt draws the juices to the outside, making the meat stringy and dry.

Do not “boil” the meat; put it on the grill or in a frying pan over high heat.

Piercing the meat allows the juices to escape, so avoid using table or carving forks and turn it as gently as possible with the help of forceps or a spoon.

Do not make tagliata if you like your meat well-done: To remain soft and succulent, lean meats must only be cooked for a short time.

Do not cut the meat immediately, let it rest in the oven for 5 minutes; this time allows the juices to redistribute among the fibres of the meat, so they don’t all leak out at the first cut.

The meat will lose its succulence if you do not eat it fresh out the oven. In any case, you can reuse any leftovers in a Bolognese sauce, Mondeghili meatballs, or filling for meat raviolini.

To make an excellent tagliata, the quality of the meat is of fundamental importance.

The most suitable cut is the entrecôte or sirloin, which has the right balance of lean and fatty parts. Contact your trusted butcher for recommendations regarding any alternative cuts that have these characteristics. Slice the meat no thinner than 4–5 cm so the tagliata retains its succulence.

Usually tagliata should be eaten rare, at most medium.

You can check if the meat is cooked to the desired doneness by touch: It should be soft to the touch and form a depression, which becomes less evident the longer it is cooked.

Ingredients for 4 people

For the steak tagliata

800 g whole beef sirloin

1 sprig rosemary

Fleur de sel crystals from Cervia or Trapani

For the salad

120 g mixed greens

300 g datterini tomatoes

Vinegar

Extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper

Wine pairing

Steak tagliata goes perfectly with full-bodied red wines such as Chianti classico, Gattinara, and Rosso di Montalcino, or other well-structured reds.

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