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Veal ossobuco with gremolada

Ossobuco with gremolada is a typical dish in Milanese and Brianza cuisine, especially suitable for cold seasons.

Chef Danilo Angè

Difficulty: easy

Method: 10

Cooking: 75

Difficulty: easy

Method: 10

Cooking: 75

Chef Danilo Angè

Difficulty: easy

Method: 10

Cooking: 75

Difficulty: easy

Method: 10

Cooking: 75

Basic preparations

Meat stock

Method

  1. 01 / Prepare the meat

    Eliminate excess fat

    Flour meat on both sides

    Heat extra virgin olive oil in a pan and add veal shanks when it is hot

    Brown meat on all sides, turning shanks without pricking them

  2. 02 / Prepare the vegetables

    Peel and cut carrots and onions into small cubes

    Cut celery into small cubes

    Gather aromatic herbs into a bundle and tie with food twine

  3. 03 / Cook the veal shanks

    Melt butter in a pan over low heat

    Add carrots, celery, onions, and herb bundle

    Sauté vegetables over low heat until they are slightly browned

    Add veal shanks

    Cover with wine and let it evaporate

    Add chopped tomatoes and pour in stock

    Season with salt and pepper and cook over low heat for about an hour, adding stock little by little if the sauce seems dry

    Remove from heat when meat is very soft

  4. 04 / Prepare the gremolada

    Peel lemon with a potato peeler, without removing the white pith

    Wash and strip parsley and chop leaves finely

    Chop sage, lemon peel, and garlic clove together with parsley

  5. 05 / To serve

    Put veal shanks on serving dishes

    Cover with pan sauce and vegetables

    Sprinkle with gremolada

Wine pairing

We suggest respecting the dish’s regional origins and pairing veal ossobuco with distinctive red wines from Lombardy, like a Bonarda or a Barbera dell’Oltrepò Pavese.

Basic preparations

Meat stock

You can safely cook the veal shanks the day before, storing them in the refrigerator with their sauce. When you want to serve them, reheat them in a pan over low heat.

Do not skip the browning stage; it is indispensable for sealing the juices inside the meat, giving it that characteristic browned-meat flavour and keeping the meat

Be careful not to prick the meat with a fork or other utensil while cooking so as to avoid the juices escaping.

Do not rush the veal shanks; the meat should be extremely tender and almost melt in the mouth, so the shanks must be cooked over low heat for a long time. If you buy fore shanks or beef shanks, take into account that they will have to cook longer than veal hind shanks.

Traditional gremolada lends a touch of freshness to the veal shanks. Make sure to balance the ingredients, being especially careful not to let the garlic and lemon zest overpower the others. Then only put a little gremolada on the shanks when you plate them—no more than a sprinkling.

You can store the veal shanks in an airtight container in the refrigerator for a couple of days. They keep better when covered with their sauce, which preserves the meat’s tenderness.

If you made the ossobuco with fresh rather than defrosted meat, you can also store it in the freezer.

Ossobuco with gremolada is a typical dish in Milanese and Brianza cuisine, especially suitable for cold seasons. Veal shank is preferred to beef shank as it is more tender.

Hind shank, which is richer in marrow, is also preferable to fore shank, which has more connective tissue.

Traditionally, ossobuco is served with Milanese risotto with saffron, but it can also be found alongside polenta or mashed potatoes.

Ingredients for 4 people

For the braised veal

4 cross-cut veal hind shanks

30 g tipo 00 flour

10 g extra virgin olive oil

100 g onions

100 g carrots

100 g celery

60 g butter

1 bundle aromatic herbs (bay leaf, sage, and rosemary)

100 ml white wine

300 ml meat stock

100 g chopped tomatoes

For the gremolada

1 small clove garlic

20 g parsley

2 sage leaves

1 lemon

Wine pairing

We suggest respecting the dish’s regional origins and pairing veal ossobuco with distinctive red wines from Lombardy, like a Bonarda or a Barbera dell’Oltrepò Pavese.

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