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Veal saltimbocca with mashed potatoes

Saltimbocca is very simple and quick to prepare; to maintain its pleasant succulence, it must be made at the last moment.

Chef Danilo Angè

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 50'

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 50'

Chef Danilo Angè

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 50'

Difficulty: easy

Method: 20'

Cooking: 50'

Method

  1. 01 / Prepare the mashed potatoes

    Boil potatoes with skins on, cooking for about 30 minutes from when the water is cold, or until they are very soft

    Drain and peel potatoes

    Pass them through the potato ricer while they are still hot

    Boil milk

    Add butter, cut into pieces, and Parmigiano Reggiano to mashed potatoes

    Stir well to combine

    Add hot milk, salt, and pepper and stir again until mash is homogeneous

  2. 02 / Prepare the meat

    Cut meat into slices no more than 6 mm thick

    Place a piece of prosciutto and a sage leaf on each slice of meat and secure with a toothpick

    Lightly flour meat, shaking off excess flour

  3. 03 / Cook the saltimbocca

    Heat extra virgin olive oil in a pan over medium heat

    When oil is hot, add meat slices and brown on both sides, about 2 minutes per side

    Add white wine and let it evaporate (this will only take a minute)

    Remove meat slices from the pan and place on serving dishes

    Add butter to the pan and let thicken into a sauce for a couple of minutes over low heat, allowing butter to melt and combine with pan residue

  4. 04 / To serve

    Take serving dishes with plated saltimbocca

    Complete with a drizzle of pan sauce over meat

    Accompany with mashed potatoes

Wine pairing

Serve saltimbocca with a dry red wine of medium body, such as a Velletri DOC or a red Colli di Conegliano.

Saltimbocca is very simple and quick to prepare; to maintain its pleasant succulence, it must be made at the last moment.

You can cook the potatoes as per the recipe, boiled with the skins on, the day before; they should then be mashed just before eating or, at most, one hour before.

Do not overcook the meat, otherwise your saltimbocca will be tough and stringy.

Prosciutto is naturally salty already; be careful not to add salt while cooking.

Do not let the pan sauce dry out; keep the heat gentle, cooking it just long enough for the butter to combine with the residue in the pan.

You can eat leftover saltimbocca the next day. Keep it covered in the refrigerator and, when you want to eat it, gently reheat it in a pan over low heat with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil or butter.

You can use the leftover meat to prepare Milanese meatballs or a filling for meat ravioli. You can also add it to other meats in a meat sauce.

The mashed potatoes will keep in the refrigerator, covered with cling film, for a day at most. When you want to eat them, reheat them over low heat with a drop of milk. Freezing is not recommended.

Choose a lean cut of meat with little connective tissue, suitable for quick cooking.

Buy a prosciutto crudo that has not been aged very long to prevent it from getting too salty when cooked. It must be cut into thin slices, so as not to overpower the taste of the veal.

Mashed potatoes are the classic accompaniment for saltimbocca, but you can replace them with another side dish of your choosing, even a fresh and simple green salad.

Ingredients for 4 people

For the saltimbocca

400 g lean veal

100 g prosciutto crudo, thinly sliced

1 bunch sage

30 g tipo 00 flour

100 ml white wine

20 g extra virgin olive oil

30 g butter

Salt and pepper

For the mashed potatoes

600 g potatoes

200 ml milk

80 g butter

80 g Parmigiano Reggiano, grated

Salt and pepper

Wine pairing

Serve saltimbocca with a dry red wine of medium body, such as a Velletri DOC or a red Colli di Conegliano.

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